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  Napa, CA 94558
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  Stockton, CA 95206
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Scott Wilson

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Stanislaus River Report


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Stanislaus River Basin and Calaveras River Water Use Program
Threatened and Endangered Species Report - March 1995
Bay Delta and Special Water Projects Division, CA Dept. of Fish and Game

3.2 REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS

A review of the literature to determine habitat requirements and species ranges, and consultation with CDFG's Natural Diversity Data Base (NDDB) gave the following amphibian and reptile species that were determined to potentially occur within the study area and were targeted for surveys:

  • California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense) a Category 1 candidate for listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as Threatened or Endangered, and a California Department of Fish and Game "Species of Special Concern";

  • Western spadefoot toad (Scaphiopus hammondii) a California Department of Fish and Game "Species of Special Concern";

  • California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) proposed as Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and a California Department of Fish and Game "Species of Special Concern";

  • foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) a Category 2 candidate for listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as Threatened or Endangered, and a California Department of Fish and Game "Species of Special Concern";

  • western pond turtle , two subspecies: ( Clemmys marmorata marmorata and Clemmys marmorata pallida) Category 2 candidates for listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as Threatened or Endangered, and a California Department of Fish and Game "Species of Special Concern";

  • blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia sila) listed as Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and listed as Endangered by the State of California;

  • California horned lizard (Phyrnosoma coronatum frontale) a California Department of Fish and Game "Species of Special Concern";

  • San Joaquin whipsnake (Masticophis flagellum ruddocki) a California Department of Fish and Game "Species of Special Concern";

  • Alameda whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus) proposed as Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and listed as threatened by the State of California

  • giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas) listed as Threatened by the U.S., Fish and Wildlife Service, and listed as Threatened by the State of California.

Four different survey techniques were to be utilized in an attempt to obtain as much occurrence information as possible. After a short reconnaissance period, pitfall traps, searching, seining, and spotlighting methods were to be utilized. Each technique was designed to capture animals that use different modes of mobility; some techniques capture animals that travel diurnally while others are useful for nocturnal animals. Surveys were to start from middle to late January 1995 and continue into late September or early October. However, mid-December 1994 DWR halted further survey effort on the project.

One partial day was spent informally surveying for amphibians and reptiles during July while in the canyon reach after collecting HEP data. Four additional days were spent sampling between September and December. Three of these four days occurred during the fall and early winter season, each time after a rainfall when chances of locating California tiger salamanders were better. One of these field efforts was during nighttime hours. The data that were collected included species, location, time, habitat, temperature, wind, and cloud cover.

Appendix B lists the amphibian and reptile species observed in the area of the Stanislaus River as reported by NDDB (1994) and by BioSystems (1994).